Palliative care centre pushed in capital budget

The government of Prince Edward Island is tightening the purse strings as it shifts from a series of stimulus budgets to a leaner capital budget.

Government returning to ‘normal spending levels’ in new plan

The government of Prince Edward Island is tightening the purse strings as it shifts from a series of stimulus budgets to a leaner capital budget.

Finance Minister Wes Sheridan unveiled the capital budget Wednesday, which included $73 million in infrastructure spending across the province.

That’s an $11 million decrease from the capital budget released in Nov. 2012. In the peak of the recession, the capital budget covered $133 million in investments.

“We are now returning to normal spending levels after the stimulus capital budgets,” Sheridan said in the house.

He said the stimulus money allowed Islanders to continue working during the global recession.

“Those budgets also allowed us to provide much-needed improvements to our manors, hospitals, schools and highways.”

Health services are receiving a significant portion of the budget, including the funding of the province’s new palliative care centre, which is slated to be completed in fall, 2014.

The province will also spend $8 million to renovate the Queen Elizabeth Hospital’s day surgery department. It will construct the Riverview Manor in Montague, and a new 24 bed long-term care facility in Tyne Valley.

In the Education sector, money has been allocated for the Souris School and additions to École François-Boute. Another $13 million will be spent on upgrading IT equipment and infrastructure for students.

The budget also includes $27 million for projects to improve highways and additional funding for the Bonshaw Hills Wilderness Park.

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