P.E.I.'s first collaborative emergency seeing few patients

Prince Edward Island’s first collaborative emergency centre has been treating an average of about two patients night since it opened in Alberton earlier this month.

Prince Edward Island’s first collaborative emergency centre has been treating an average of about two patients a night since it opened in Alberton earlier this month.

Island health officials say 30 patients have been through the doors of the emergency centre since it opened in Western Hospital on Nov. 4.

During the day the hospital functions as a normal emergency department.

But between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. it is staffed by emergency nurses and paramedics with specialized training. They can consult by phone with an on-call doctor.

Before the the new plan was in place, Western Hospital was operating just 14 hours a day as there were too few doctors to work overnight shifts.

The move is modelled after similar collaborative emergency centres that have opened in Nova Scotia

The latest data from the Alberton emergency centre shows most patients arrive between 8 p.m. and midnight. Only four showed up in the early morning hours.

There were four nights where there were no people needing help at all.

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