Prince Edward Island men have the highest incidence rates of melanoma in Canada, according to a new report from the Canadian Cancer Society.

Lori Barker

The Canadian Cancer Society is reaching out to young parents and daycares to teach about the dangers of sun exposure in the hopes of preventing future melanoma, says Lori Barker, executive director of the P.E.I. division of the Canadian Cancer Society. (CBC)

The rate of 28.8 per 100,000 for men is more than double that for Island women. P.E.I. had the largest discrepancy in incidence rates between men and women.

The national incidence rate for men was 15.9 per 100,000.

The society also singles out younger Canadians for ignoring the dangers of UV rays.

"Any tan is a bad tan. There's no such thing as safe exposure," said Lori Barker, executive director of the P.E.I. division of the Canadian Cancer Society.

"We always have recognized the importance and risk of sun burn but we haven't recognized that around the tan. So any change in skin colour is an indication of damage."

Barker said extra efforts are being made to reach out to daycares and new parents to educate them about sun safety.