P.E.I. Christmas 'miracle' thanks to kindness of strangers

A Prince Edward Island man is making a Christmas wish come true for his elderly parents with the help of thousands of strangers around the world.

'Miracle on 34th Street' inspires 17,000 letters to pour in from across the globe for ailing couple

Don and Bev Enman, who both have advanced dementia, received 17,000 Christmas cards thanks to their children's idea to give them A Miracle on 34th Street moment. 1:56

A Prince Edward Island man is making a Christmas wish come true for his elderly parents with the help of thousands of strangers around the world.

Mark Enman's ailing parents, Don and Bev, both have advanced dementia and live in a Summerside nursing home.

Christmas is the couple's favourite time of year, and their favourite holiday movie isMiracle on 34th Street.

This year, Mark Enman and his sister wanted to do something special for their parents by recreating the scene in the Christmas classic where thousands of letters addressed to Santa Claus are delivered to a courtroom — their mother's favourite moment in the film.

"I kind of put the two things together — her love of Christmas cards and that scene," said Enman.

"I said, ‘Let's give Don and Bev, my parents, A Miracle on 34th Street moment.’"

Enman started a Facebook page asking people to send his parents Christmas cards — and word spread fast.

He expected perhaps a few hundred cards but more than 17,000 cards arrived from all across the globe, including far-reaching places like New Zealand and South Korea.

“I did not even once anticipate my parents would receive 17,000 cards,” said Enman.

Granddaughter Hayley was surprised by the outpouring of Christmas cheer.

"I think it's amazing how they would use their time to just send Christmas cards," she said.

Thanks to the love and kindness of so many people, Enman got his Christmas wish.

"It made her smile. And that's what this was all about. To bring my parents a smile for a holiday when they haven't had one for a long time."

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