There have been two official outbreaks of norovirus on P.E.I. this year, and a lot of informal reports that it is going around in the general population.

Norovirus

Norovirus spreads through contaminated food and water. (CBC)

The intestinal virus causes vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. Health officials only track outbreaks at residential facilities, and two have been struck with the virus. Both are under control now.

"Some staff were involved and some people in the facility and it is winding down now," said deputy chief health officer Dr. David Sabapathy.

"They just followed the regular precautions and did the enhanced environmental cleaning. And it has pretty much kind of run its course at this point."

Health officials won't identity the facilities that have had the virus.

Many Islanders got in touch with CBC News saying they were showing signs of the illness.

Jeannie Cameron has been sick for days.

"Probably 12 hours straight I was vomiting, and of course the diarrhea comes with it," said Cameron.

"It's really strange, because there was shooting pains in my ribs."

The symptoms normally last a couple of days.

'It takes a toll on your body for sure.'- Jeannie Cameron

Norovirus spreads mostly through contaminated food and water, but can also be transmitted through the air from spray of vomit or diarrhea. One cleaning company told CBC News the only way to eliminate the virus is by totally sterilizing the surrounding area. That can be hard to do when you're sick, said Cameron.

"I got up and I sterilized both the bathrooms and sterilized the kitchen counters and things and did some laundry," she said.

"That's about as far as you can go when you're about the third or fourth day into this thing. It takes a toll on your body for sure."

Health Canada says the number one way to cut down on your chance of getting norovirus is washing your hands regularly, especially before making or eating food. If someone does get sick, it recommends bleaching surfaces in your home.

Health Canada says people with norovirus can be contagious for up to two days after the symptoms stop.

For mobile device users: Have you been hit by a nasty intestinal virus this year?