New Canada Conference youth aiming for impact

One hundred young Canadians in Charlottetown this week are planning to make their ideas part of the 2015 federal election campaign.

Ideas book from conference to be presented to federal politicians

The 100 delegates at the New Canada Conference have broken into groups to discuss a variety of issues facing the country over the next half century. (Julia Cook/CBC)

One hundred young Canadians in Charlottetown this week are planning to make their ideas part of the 2015 federal election campaign.

The New Canada Conference is part of 2014 celebrations in Charlottetown, marking the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference, which began the talks leading to the creation of Canada.

The delegates arrange their ideas on the wall at the Confederation Centre. (Julia Cook/CBC)

The 100 Canadians, aged 19 to 24, were selected from applicants from across the country. They have gathered in Charlottetown this week to discuss how they'd like the country to look over the next 50 years.

"Think this crowd we have together is going to keep in touch and I think you'll see this material in the election platforms in 2015, as well," said Sean Court of P.E.I.

The delegates have broken into eight groups, focusing on areas such as health care, global issues, and the environment.

"You need to listen to our ideas and our goals our visions," said Betty Mao of Vancouver.

"Otherwise, what is the future? The future is in our hands."

Guest experts sit with each group and help guide the discussions. Dr. Ryan Meili, a family physician from Saskatoon, is working with the health care group.

"We don't do this very often. We don't step back and ask the big picture of what are we really trying to achieve," said Meili.

"That's exciting to me, and I think can have a big influence on our public discussions."

At the end of the conference, participants will create an idea book that will be presented to political leaders.

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