Volunteer firefighter writes song for first responders and dispatchers

Volunteer firefighter Brandon Gillis of Charlottetown has penned a song about the on-call life dedicated to "first responders and dispatchers whose lives are dictated by the tone."

Woes of on-call life captured in Mr. Pager Man, song written and recorded by volunteer firefighter

Brandon Gillis made a video to go along with his song Mr. Pager Man. (YouTube)

Volunteer firefighter Brandon Gillis of Charlottetown has penned a song about the on-call life dedicated to "first responders and dispatchers whose lives are dictated by the tone."

"Hey, Mr. Pager Man, where are we going? The belt is a beeping, better get the trucks rollin'," goes the chorus.

"Hey, Mr. Pager Man, what's the address. I hope it's nothing serious."

In the verses, he sings about how the beep of the pager can affect life — from interrupting a kiss on date night, to a middle of the night wake-up.

"It's three a.m. and it's cold outside. I can't find my socks, and you woke up my wife," goes one verse.

"I hit my head on the stairs and I can't find my keys. You're lucky that your page said please."

Volunteer firefighter Brandon Gillis, with his wife, Jennifer. Gillis describes how life on call affects his personal life in his new song. (Submitted by Brandon Gillis)

Gillis said the song was inspired by the beep of his pager.

"I was playing some music in my living room like I always do and my pager went off and vibrated," he said.

He started writing the jingle, and texted it to a few of his firefighting friends. They encouraged him to record, and one firefighter, Andrew Chisholm, edited the music video.

"The song really just relates to everyday life. You're going through it and you have a pager on. It could be a call, it could be a false alarm. It could be an accident or a small fire, but you're never sure when that's going to happen," said Gillis.

With files from Stephanie Kelly

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