Immigrants attracted to new community garden

Charlottetown's new legacy garden is attracting a lot of new immigrants, who are getting the opportunity to mix with established Islanders working the plot next door.

Native Islanders and immigrants sharing ideas in legacy garden

The legacy garden on the old experimental farm in Charlottetown is turning into a meeting place for immigrants and established Islanders. (CBC)

Charlottetown's new legacy garden is attracting a lot of new immigrants, who are getting the opportunity to mix with established Islanders working the plot next door.

The legacy garden was established this year at the old experimental farm as part of 2014 celebrations. There are 100 plots, and new immigrants have taken charge of about 20 of them

The P.E.I. Association for Newcomers has been encouraging immigrants to participate.

"It's a really great opportunity to engage and connect with established Islanders - the Island community - there's a lot of back and forth that happens here," said Farm Centre legacy garden coordinator Adam McLean.

"The other [benefit] is the ability to grow food that you might not find at the Superstore or Sobey's, for example, or that might be unaffordable or not so fresh."

The project has been successful so far in its first season. All the plots are being used and it already has a waiting list for next year's growing season.

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