High school leaders take over Montague

The population of the eastern P.E.I. town of Montague is significantly higher this week with 1,000 high school leaders from across the country holding a conference there.
Students march to open the Canadian Student Leadership Conference in Montague. (CBC)

The population of the eastern P.E.I. town of Montague is significantly larger this week with 1,000 high school leaders from across the country holding a conference there.

The students will discuss difficult issues such as bullying and teen suicide, says organizer Bethany MacLeod. (CBC)

Most days of the year, the population of Montague is about 1,900. Organizers of the Canadian Student Leadership Conference are expressing their gratitude to local residents for opening up their homes to the visiting students. Local delegate Amy McKenzie is showing her fellow student leaders around her home town.

"It's ridiculous. I can't even describe it. Every day here has been crazy," said McKenzie.

The students were selected for the Montague conference because of their leadership qualities, and they'll spend the next few days discussing issues affecting teenagers.

"It's really important just because we're closer to the issues than adults are," said delegate Ethan McAleese.

Organizer Bethany MacLeod said the conference will teach students how to deal with difficult issues such as bullying and depression.

"There's some on teen suicide. There's some on texting, and safety there. There's leadership and how to be a better leader," she said.

Canadian Student Leadership Conference runs from Sep. 17-21.

For mobile device users:What is the key issue facing teenagers today?

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