Hermanville wind farm tour intended to ease doubts

An open house at the new Hermanville wind farm hosted by the P.E.I. government attracted more than 150 local residents Thursday evening.

Each of 10 turbines produces 1% of P.E.I.'s power

Residents got up close and personal with new wind turbines in eastern P.E.I. 1:35

An open house at the new Hermanville wind farm hosted by the P.E.I. government attracted more than 150 local residents Thursday evening.

The province wants the public to see how much power the $60-million, 10-turbine Clearspring Wind Project in eastern P.E.I. is generating and to put to rest any doubts about it.

The P.E.I. government offered a tour of the new Hermanville wind farm for interested residents. (CBC)
Each turbine generates one per cent of P.E.I.'s power.

Islanders will benefit from more wind energy in the long run, says project manager Carl Brothers.

"We now get 30 per cent of our electricity from wind, and that wind offers to Prince Edward Island, probably the most cost-effective option they have for the next 25 years, with zero emissions."

Some in the community fought the construction over worry of noise, aesthetics and what they say was a lack of consultation.

The Prince Edward Distillery, nearly next door to the wind farm, has filed a lawsuit against the province.

Local resident Earl MacDonald says the wind farm seems to be quite popular. (CBC)
But Energy Minister Wes Sheridan says the distillery's owners are the exception.

"Very little opposition, even at the beginning," said Sheridan.

"What was very interesting about this site is that we told Islanders very clearly, this administration, that we would not put it in any site where they opposed it."

Earl MacDonald took advantage of the wind farm tour.

"It's not as disruptive as it's supposed to be to everything around, but it's actually turning out to be quite popular I think."

The community is receiving $125,000 a year as compensation for housing the turbines.

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