Genetically-modified salmon eggs approved commercially

Environment Canada has given AquaBounty Technologies the go-ahead to produce genetically-modified salmon eggs on a commercial scale at its P.E.I. facility, the company has announced.

Environment Canada has given AquaBounty Technologies the go-ahead to produce genetically-modified salmon eggs on a commercial scale at its P.E.I. facility, the company has announced.

AquaBounty's hatchery in eastern P.E.I. has been a research-only production site, but now the company is saying the facility in Bay Fortune has the go-ahead from Environment Canada to produce the fish eggs on a commercial scale.

AquaBounty fish are genetically modified to grow twice as quickly as regular salmon.

If the Massachusetts-based company gets approval from the U.S. Food and Drug administration for sale in the States, the P.E.I.-produced eggs would be shipped to a facility in Panama to be grown into adults and then harvested for food.

In a news release Monday, Aqua Bounty said rigorous examinations of its P.E.I. hatchery were done by Environment Canada, along with a risk assessment by Fisheries and Oceans, and a review by a panel of independent scientific experts.

CBC News has not confirmed with Environment Canada if it has approved commercial production in Bay Fortune, P.E.I.

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