French school advocate featured at museum

A P.E.I. mother who fought for a French school in Summerside is being featured in a new human rights museum in Winnipeg.

A P.E.I. mother who fought for a French school in Summerside is being featured in a new human rights museum in Winnipeg.

Fifteen years ago Noella Arsenault brought her case to the Supreme Court of Canada. She won her case and set a precedent for students to not have to travel long distances to attend a French school. Her story will be part of the Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg when it opens next year.

Arsenault said it's quite an honour.

"I want everybody to know that they can make a difference in life, and it's just by standing by your convictions that you do that," she said.

"I'm proud to have done what I've done and it has helped people, I know that, and that's all I could wish for."

Information on Arsenault's human rights case will also be available on the museum's website.

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