A Charlottetown women's shelter is hoping to make it easier for newcomers to reach out to them if they've been the victims of family violence.

Family Violence Prevention Services is creating a new video aimed at introducing people whose first language isn't English to its services.

The video will be translated into five languages: Arabic, Persian, Mandarin, Spanish and French.

Reaching out to potential victims

Danya O'Malley, the executive director of FVPS, said the video will help victims become more familiar with the services FVPS offers, including Anderson House shelter.

"The hope is that people can watch and listen and become more familiar with our services, what we offer, how to access our services and what to expect when you stay in the shelter," said O'Malley.

O'Malley said there is a need for these resources in newcomer communities, and that translation is often needed.

"We've done a few different projects where we've trained interpreters that work with the newcomers association and we've had various resources translated into different languages," said O'Malley.

Danya O'Malley

Danya O'Malley, the executive director of FVPS, said the video will help victims become more familiar with the services available on P.E.I. (Family Violence Prevention Services)

Video in 3 parts

The video will be split up into three parts. The first focuses on the laws regarding family violence, the second is about services available to victims and the third focuses on the shelter specifically.

O'Malley said the final part is important because many don't know what to expect when entering a shelter.

"A lot of people tell us that they're surprised that the shelter's not how they were expecting it. I think people expect it to feel more institutionalized and they are surprised that it has a very homey feel," said O'Malley.

The videos will last anywhere between five and seven minutes depending on the language. O'Malley said the entire project will cost about $7,000 "[including] all the translation services, the videographer and all the associated costs."

The project was funded by the The Law Foundation of P.E.I.

With files from Sarah MacMillan