Early childhood educators' pay on table for new year

The association representing early childhood educators on P.E.I. says it's been asking for years for the provincial government to increase wages for its members.

Pre-school teachers making less than liquor store clerks

The association representing early childhood educators on P.E.I. says it's been asking for years for the provincial government to increase wages for its members.

The Early Childhood Development Association of P.E.I. will be back talking to the government about wages in the new year, says executive director Sonya Hooper. (Early Childhood Development Association of P.E.I.)

Last week in the provincial legislature the Official Opposition pointed out early childhood educators haven't seen a wage increase in five years, and noted clerks in government liquor stores earn more money.

"What always amazes me is why we have to compare early childhood educators wages to another position in order to find them astonishingly low," said Sonya Hooper, executive director of the Early Childhood Development Association of P.E.I.

"[$]16.88 with a college diploma or university degree is not a reasonable wage to deliver the expectation to keep these children safe and secure, and meanwhile educating them in their pre-school years."

The $16.88/hour mentioned by Hooper is the top wage for an early childhood educator on P.E.I. The pay scale starts at $12.

Hooper said her association is scheduled to meet with the minister early in the new year. She hopes they'll come to an agreement on a wage increase.

The Opposition says at a minimum government should index those wages to inflation.

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