The hot weather that has struck P.E.I. this summer is making farmers nervous as harvest season draws nearer.

One potato farmer says the dry weather could cut yields by 15 per cent. And if it doesn't rain soon, it could be worse.

Brian Ching

Brian Ching says he’s noticed the effect of weather when he digs up the soil around his potatoes. (CBC)

Brian Ching says he’s noticed the effect of weather when he digs up the soil around his potatoes.

“It's just so dry, it's more like a powder,” he said. “If you take it in your hand you can't make it stay together.”

Eastern P.E.I. has seen some of the driest conditions.  

The Potato Board says some farmers in the west had a bit more rain but all farmers are feeling the pressure the dry season has brought.

“It's dry enough to be a concern to most potato farmers,” said Ching.

He said his crops need a good soaking down to roots to keep going. 

Harvest season cut short

Vegetable farmer Carol Blum harvests 25 acres of land to get the vegetables for her market stall.

Vegetable farmer Carol Blum

Vegetable farmer Carol Blum says this is one of the driest and hottest summers she's experienced. (CBC)

“I've been doing market gardening for almost 30 years and I have to say this is one of the driest and hottest summers that we've ever experienced on the farm,” she said.

Blum said some crops like beans seem to like the heat but for other crops the harvest season is finishing too soon and the vegetables aren’t growing as large as they should be. 

For now farmers are hoping the current forecast will change and their crops will get the moisture they need.