Charlottetown stroke victim Kyle Jay inspiration at the gym

Just like others at a Charlottetown gym, Kyle Jay takes to the weight machines for a solid workout. It's a far cry from where Jay was six years ago, when all he could do was blink his eyes after suffering a brain stem stroke at just 18 years of age.

Jay lifting weights with help of professional wrestler 'Cowboy' Mike Hughes and trainer Jason Mosher

Kyle Jay of Charlottetown works out with trainer Jason Mosher. Jay suffered a brain stem stroke when he was 18 years old, but has made an inspirational recovery. (CBC)

Just like others at a Charlottetown gym, Kyle Jay takes to the weight machines for a solid workout.

It's a far cry from where Jay was six years ago, when all he could do was blink his eyes after suffering a brain stem stroke at just 18 years of age.

Jay uses a wheelchair, and can’t speak because of a tracheotomy. But his progress has been strong enough since the stroke that he recently took his first steps with the help of a walker.

"At one point we were told he’d never move,” says his father, Garth Jay. “You you can see for yourself that that's certainly not the case."

His father credits some of Kyle's improvement to help his son receives from two trainers: Jason Mosher, and professional wrestler “Cowboy” Mike Hughes.

He's been working out with the two for four years and trains three times a week.

“Kyle’s a great fellow,” Hughes said. “He’s a young guy who’s driven. He wants to get better and he’s the most motivating, ambitious person that I’ve ever met.”

As he lifts weights, Kyle’s determination shows by the strain written across his face. It’s the type of effort that others at the gym notice.

"It kind of puts things in perspective pretty quickly,” Mosher said. “He inspires a lot of people."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.