Cheryl Louzado

Louzado said the data tracking project will take about a year and an evaluation report will be submitted to Health PEI for any further action. (Laura Chapin/CBC)

Two projects have just been launched on Prince Edward Island tracking the use of chemotherapy and radiation to determine if patients are getting timely access to those treatments.

The research is being done by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer along with Health PEI.

In total, $2.1 million is being invested to do five data tracking projects across the country.

Program manager Cheryl Louzado said the Island projects will allow Health PEI to see if cancer patients are getting timely access to chemotherapy drugs and radiation therapy and the appropriate dose for their stage of illness.

"We're able to then shine the light on gaps in the system, you know, which patients didn't receive care according to the guidelines, and actually direct quality improvement practices or initiatives to those particular areas," she said.

Louzado said the data tracking project will take about a year and an evaluation report will be submitted to Health PEI for any further action.

"Ultimately, at the end of this, it's all about our patients. It's about improving the care that they receive. The quality of care that they receive," she said.

With files from Laura Chapin