A new report from the Heart and Stroke Foundation baby boomers may be less healthy than they think.

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There is no quick fix for a healthy lifestyle, says Dr. Beth Abramson of the Heart and Stroke Foundation. (Heart and Stroke Foundation)

The 2013 report card on the health of Canadians shows 80 per cent of Canadian baby boomers think their doctor would rate them as healthy, but many don't have healthy eating habits, more than half are inactive, one in 10 drinks heavily and one in five smokes.

"A lot of us know that we should be making lifestyle changes, but it's harder to make a lifestyle change than take a pill and everyone's looking for that quick fix," said foundation cardiologist Dr. Beth Abramson.

"There is no quick fix. We need to get out there and try and lead healthier lives. It's a small change in our everyday routine. It can have a long lasting impact in the future."

Gordon Phillips of Stanley Bridge, P.E.I. had a heart attack more than a year ago. He feels he always took pretty good care of himself, but the attack made him more aware of his health. "It's run through my mind a number of times: why do we also wait for something to happen before we start doing these things," said Phillips.

"We can preach it all we want, but we're not doing it. Why are we not exercising more from day one? Why wait till something happens to do it? It's an uphill battle then to get yourself back into some kind of physical condition."

The Heart and Stroke Foundation is encouraging Canadians to take their online quiz to see if they are at risk.

For mobile device users: How would you rate your health lifestyle?