Striking P.E.I. Canadian Blood Services workers 'adopted' for Christmas

An adopt-a-striker campaign is providing some help and support to striking Canadian Blood Services workers on P.E.I.

'I am hoping it will make their Christmas a little better,' says CUPE Local 1870 president

Canadian Blood Service workers in P.E.I. got some help from other unions for Christmas. (submitted by CUPE)

An adopt-a-striker campaign is providing some help and support to striking Canadian Blood Services workers on P.E.I.

The nine part-time workers have been on strike for 16 weeks and no new talks are scheduled.

Members of Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 1870 have been gathering donations from members and other unions to give the workers some Christmas help.

Tracy Carmichael, president of CUPE 1870, said everyone was anxious to give and nearly $5,000 was raised.

Deliveries were made to the picket line Friday.

Carmichael was motivated to help because she is a blood donor and knows the workers personally.

"They have been out for four months and it's Christmas time and Christmas is a time for giving," she said.

"Being on strike is difficult. I am hoping that it will make their Christmas a little better. I don't know if it's going to do a huge amount but hopefully it will do something. It will give them something and know that other people are concerned about them. It will show them that somebody cares."

The money was used to buy food for turkey dinners, plus gift cards for groceries, gas and other items.

The main sticking point between the workers and Canadian Blood Services is a guaranteed minimum number of work hours per week.

The workers have been on strike since Sept. 7.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.