Ottawa police officer facing criminal charges

An Ottawa police constable is facing a number of criminal charges including unlawful entry and possession of a weapon.

Const. Marcel Allen, who has epilepsy, called for training for officers on dealing with seizures

Ottawa police Const. Marcel Allen is facing three criminal charges after a recent incident. He has epilespy, and isn't allowed to drive or carry a gun while on duty. (CBC)

An Ottawa police officer is facing a number of criminal charges including unlawful entry and possession of a weapon.

Const. Marcel Allen, 49, is charged with uttering a threat, possession of a weapon and unlawful entry, according to courthouse records.

A bail hearing was held Wednesday morning.

Police declined to provide any other information about the case early Wednesday afternoon, including when the alleged offences occurred, and whether they were committed while the officer was on duty or off.

Police did confirm late Wednesday afternoon that Allen has been suspended.

Allen has no prior criminal record. In 2014, he was convicted of driving with an improper licence under the Highway Traffic Act and was fined $610, courthouse records show.

Officer has epilepsy

In October 2016, Allen was interviewed by CBC Edmonton about the arrests of two Edmonton men with epilepsy.

In the interview Allen revealed he has epilepsy and isn't allowed to drive or carry a gun while on duty. Allen said he manages the condition with medication, exercise and healthy eating. He said the arrests in Edmonton were further proof that police officers should be taught how do deal with people who are having seizures, and called for mandatory training.

Allen told CBC he'd woken up in handcuffs three times after having seizures on the job in Ottawa. He said he was also Tasered in front of his children while off duty near Parliament Hill in 2008.

Allen was never charged in those incidents, but said every time a seizure landed him in handcuffs, he was further inspired to develop a training program for police.

"It's very hard to explain," he said, trying to describe the feeling of coming back to consciousness from a seizure and finding himself in police custody.

"There is that disorientation, the uneasiness, the fatigue. And then you're trying to figure out exactly what you're doing here."