New Ottawa pedestrian memorials aim to improve safety

An Ottawa group is mirroring the “ghost bike” memorials at spots where cyclists have been killed as a reminder of pedestrian safety.

Similar to ghost bikes left at scene of cyclist deaths

Walk Ottawa plans to erect a plywood marker each time a pedestrian is killed. 2:01

An Ottawa group is mirroring the “ghost bike” memorials at spots where cyclists have been killed as a reminder of pedestrian safety.

Walk Ottawa has placed a plywood marker designed to look like a “walk” symbol on Woodroffe Avenue near Knightsbridge Road, the place a woman was struck and killed earlier this month.

Somerset Councillor Diane Holmes said pedestrian safety is worthy of more attention.

“There are two or three times the number of pedestrian deaths versus cycling deaths… over the last many years, so there are more pedestrians killed and injured than cyclists and we have to look at the problems,” she said.

“Do they need a longer green light, does the sidewalk need to be wider, does there need to be traffic calming? There are lots of things to do, it's just a matter of getting down to doing them.”

Plans to continue for every death

“Ghost bikes” are painted white, often decorated with flowers and other tokens and locked up near the site of a cyclist’s death.

Sean Hockin said Walk Ottawa's memorial is more effective than leaving flowers. (CBC)

Sean Hockin said Walk Ottawa’s memorial stood out to him as he walked by on Friday.

“It certainly stands out more than the flowers do and it's a little bit of a better representation of what happened at the intersection awhile ago,” he said.

“(It’s) certainly something to sort of catch your attention.”

Walk Ottawa said it plans to put up other memorials each time a pedestrian is killed.

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