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Fallen condo glass being investigated

Developers of a downtown condo have called in engineers from Toronto to find out why a glass panel fell from a 10th-storey balcony, scattering glass onto the street.
Fall of glass from 10th floor condo leads to investigation. 2:38

Developers of a downtown condo have called in engineers from Toronto to find out why a glass panel fell from a 10th-storey balcony, scattering glass onto the street.

The incident happened Thursday afternoon. A 10th-floor balcony window pane at the 23-storey Mondrian condo building shattered and fell, scattering shards of glass on an outdoor lounge on the sixth floor, as well as the sidewalk of Bank Street near Laurier Avenue.

No one was seriously hurt.

The incident was similar to a spate of incidents that have seen shards of glass rain down from skyscraper balconies in downtown Toronto, and came on the same day the province announced new building code rules to help prevent glass panels from breaking off highrise balconies during hot weather.

Mondrian Condominiums sent an inspector from the Toronto engineering firm that dealt with the shattered glass problem in Toronto condos to investigate.

Neither the inspector nor the condo managers would comment on the incident.

Some residents worried

Many people living in the building were reluctant to talk openly about the incident, with some dismissing it as a one-time thing while others said they were worried.

Dan Hamelin has lived in the building for more than three years and said it's not the first time a glass pane has come loose.

"Just sitting out and the neighbour downstairs heard a pop and he thought I dropped something on the balcony," said Hamelin. "I went and looked and the glass was just a little bit off. And they came and just screwed it back in."

The province is calling on builders to use new glass that's heat strengthed and laminated, more like a car windshield. But the new rules won't apply to existing buildings, only new ones.

David De Rose, an engineer with Halsall Associates, said more building code changes are likely on the way.

"That's going to be everything from design to quality control to installation to testing and so forth a lot more changes coming down the pipe," said De Rose.