An Ottawa t-shirt designer said he was shocked to discover his unique Senators logo for sale at a major sports retailer.

Jamie McLennan is the man behind the "Don't F--- with the Walrus" shirts that went on sale after a Montreal Canadiens player called Ottawa Senators coach Paul MacLean a "bug-eyed, fat walrus."

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Jamie McLennan is the man behind the 'Don't F--- with the Walrus' shirts. (CBC)

The expletive on McLennan's shirt is covered with a large moustache, the coach's trademark facial feature.

McLennan produced two runs of the red shirts for sale, with one dollar from each going to the Sens Foundation, an organization that raises money for community groups.

On Wednesday night a friend tweeted a photo from a local mall, where a Sports Experts store had racks of nearly identical shirts for sale.

Last week McLennan stopped another designer from selling a version of his shirt, but it seems the company that printed the shirts for both entrepreneurs then began selling them to Sports Experts.

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The shirts went on sale after a Montreal Canadiens player called Ottawa Senators coach Paul MacLean a 'bug-eyed, fat walrus.' (CBC)

"They took our artwork without our knowing, stole our artwork to make their own profit on it. We did this as a fun project, and it was to raise money for the Sens Foundation, so for them to steal from the little guy for their own gain is just absurd, and it's really upsetting," said McLennan.

Sports Experts pulls product

Mike Swartzack, who owns several Sports Experts stores in Ottawa, said he had no idea who was behind the original design. Sports Experts pulled its version of the Walrus shirt off the shelves on Thursday and and apologized to McLennan.

"We're going to take the revenues, not just the profit but the revenues from the sale of the t-shirt ... and we're going to donate it to the Ottawa Senators Foundation. It's the right thing to do," said Swartzack.

The store had already sold about forty and the store's owner said he will donate all proceeds, about $600, to the Sens Foundation.

"If we can get more money to the Sens Foundation, that's one of the reasons why we started this, so I'm pleased with that result," said McLennan.