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Shelley Morris, NSTU president, said the union doesn't believe the ads violate the Elections Act . (Google Streetview)

Elections Nova Scotia says the province's teachers union was not in compliance with the Elections Act when it posted an ad in a Halifax newspaper.

The agency said it received a complaint that the Nova Scotia Teacher’s Union bought election advertising in The Chronicle Herald without registering as a third party.

Elections Nova Scotia investigated, and has told the union it must register in order to comply with the requirements of the act.  

Shelley Morris, NSTU president, said the union doesn't believe the ads violate the Elections Act. She said the union is doing exactly what it's supposed to.

"The NSTU is the statutory authority to advance and promote the cause of education in Nova Scotia and we take that responsibility seriously. Whenever there is an election, we talk about what’s important for education and students in Nova Scotia," she said.

She said the NSTU placed the ads to encourage parents to ask the candidates the tough questions about education

"The NSTU was asking parents and teachers and other members of the public to ask questions regarding education when they spoke with candidates and we didn’t believe that publicizing those questions amounted to election advertising," said Morris.

The union is refusing to register as a third party, but it has pulled the ads and is co-operating with Elections Nova Scotia.

The NSTU represents more than 10,000 public school teachers, community college faculty and professional support staff in Nova Scotia, and teachers who work for the Atlantic Provinces Special Education Authority in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.