Environment Canada's Canadian Hurricane Centre is continuing to monitor the progress of Hurricane Sandy, which is forcing officials in the city of New York to take some drastic measures.

On Sunday afternoon, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered an evacuation that affected more than 375,000 people living in low-lying areas, as that area and others up and down the Eastern seaboard prepare for Hurricane Sandy's potentially deadly wind and rain.

Forecasters fear the system could collide with a storm front from the west, bringing a super storm that will impact the Maritime provinces as well.

The storm is still continuing to grow in size and is expected to make landfall on the east coast of the United States on Monday.

As for the Maritimes, Environment Canada expects it will bring a lot of wind and rain by Tuesday.

"Strong and gusty winds everywhere from southern Ontario and in through Quebec and into the Maritimes," Environment Canada stated in a Sunday afternoon update.

"Given the track of the storm and the sheer size, we're looking at the risk of some potentially high waves coming onshore."

Environment Canada expects those swells could reach eight metres in the southern part of Nova Scotia. They are also forecasting up to 75 millimetres of rain Tuesday heading into Wednesday in parts of the region.

The storm swells could be a concern for communities along the Bay of Fundy, where the world's highest tides will be affected not only by the winds and rains, but also a full moon on Monday night.

Air travel to and from the Maritimes is expected to be heavily affected as major U.S. hubs begin to cancel flights. Anyone who is travelling over the next few days should check with their airline.