Queens County Advance prints final edition after 140 years

The community newspaper, based in Liverpool, N.S., was a dedicated publisher of local history, says the director of the Queens County Museum.

'It's always been part of the family for a number of generations'

The Queens County Advance preserved the history of the Liverpool area for 140 years. (Colleen Jones/CBC)

The Queens County Advance publishes for the final time today.

The Advance's owner, SaltWire Network, announced in May it would merge the paper with the South Shore Breaker.

The closure follows an ongoing trend across the country of community newspapers folding as more and more people turn to online news sources. 

The community newspaper based in Liverpool, N.S., was a dedicated publisher of local history, said the director of the Queens County Museum.

"The thing that I love about the Advance, right back to very beginning, is that it's full of history," Linda Rafuse said in an interview with CBC's Mainstreet on Friday.

Part of the family

"Some of those history stories are stories that would have been lost had they not been put in the newspaper. That's what's always been great about them. They're also a great preserver of history."

Linda Rafuse, the director of the Queens County Museum, received the last copy of the Advance for its collection. (Colleen Jones/CBC)

The museum has every issue since 1929 on file.

The archives are a hit with people researching their family history, Rafuse said.  

"You can be in the papers there looking for something with your family and within minutes you're sidetracked, and like an hour later you haven't even started to look for what you were originally looking for," said Rafuse. "Everybody loves to read them"

"It's always been part of the family for a number of generations"

The paper's Liverpool office will close.

More community paper changes

SaltWire bought the Advance last year in an acquisition of 28 Atlantic Canadian newspapers owned by Transcontinental Inc.

The company is also merging the weeklies Amherst News and The Citizen Record into one publication called the Amherst News.

Daily publications in Truro and New Glasgow are becoming weeklies starting July 1.

In a statement in May, SaltWire CEO Mark Lever said the changes reflect an evolution "when a model or product is outdated".

Read more articles at CBC Nova Scotia

With files from Carolyn Ray