Nova Scotia's top 5 most expensive homes on the real estate market

If you weren’t able to get a gift for that special someone in time for Christmas, there are few real estate listings in Nova Scotia that might quell that guilt you might be feeling.

Priciest properties on N.S. real estate market range from $3M to $7M

If you weren't able to get a gift for that special someone in time for Christmas, there are few real estate listings in Nova Scotia that might quell that guilt you might be feeling.

Then again, if you spend this kind of money without consultation, you might be in more trouble. 

The top five most expensive homes on Nova Scotia`s market range from $3 million to $7 million. Some are in the Halifax area, a couple on the South Shore.

But one deserves an honourable mention because its current price is a steal compared to what it was just six months ago. 

Long Island is the only one of the famous Five Islands in the Bay of Fundy with people living on it. (Realtor.ca)

Long Island is the only one of the Five Islands in the Bay of Fundy that has anyone living on it. The realtor's website calls what its Californian owner has built, a "private sanctuary." 

On its four hectares, there's a solar-powered central home with three satellite bedroom cottages. In between the low tides, the mainland is only a 20-minute boat ride away. 

Realtor Roger Dial says before August, the entire property cost $5 million. 
The hole on Long Island that caved in at the end of the summer. (Realtor.ca)

Now it's listed as just $2.4 million.

The markdown has everything to do with a unique feature on one end of the island — a giant hole that, up until August, allowed you to see through the island.

But the hole collapsed at the end of the summer, Dial says, and forced them to knock down the price tag. He says it could get even lower. 

So if you are going to splurge on a late Christmas gift or Boxing Day deal and you don't mind not having that hole in the island, then this property might just be the best bang for your buck. 

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