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Fred Lordly said when built his house on Emscote Drive in 1968, the city approved his storm and sewage pipes. Then he was told he had to separate his sewage from his storm drain. (CBC)

A private contractor has come forward to help Halifax senior Fred Lordly turn his water back on.

The 83-year-old Halifax man has been waging a fight with the Halifax Water Commission for the last two years.

Lordly contends when he built his house on Emscote Drive in 1968, the city approved his storm and sewage pipes. Then, in 2011, he was told he had to separate his sewage from his storm drain.

The city said the pipes are intersecting and some sewage is leaking into the Northwest Arm. But Lordly refused to pay, saying if the city has an issue with his storm runoff they can pay to fix the problem.

The utility disconnected his services in July.

On Friday, Liberal MLA Labi Kousoulis met with the Halifax Water Commission. He said the commission agreed to turn the water back on if Lordly got the pipe work done.

Schooner Excavation Ltd. stepped in on Monday and said it will fix the problem at no cost. Co-owner Darrell Gallagher said five of his men agreed to work for free next Saturday.

Lordly said he won't use the water until then. He has said he was told the job would cost between $5,000 and $12,000.

Kousoulis said Schooner Excavation has done work for him at the annual Greek festival and never billed him.