E-cigarette bill changes considered for Nova Scotia

The Nova Scotia government has sent Bill 60 back to the Department of Health and Wellness for possible changes, but one thing that won't change is how e-cigarettes are treated under the law.

Premier Stephen McNeil says he was moved by testimonials on Monday

Health Minister Leo Glavine says no changes will be made to restrictions on vaping in public. (Nam Y. Huh/Associated Press)

The Nova Scotia government has sent Bill 60 back to the Department of Health and Wellness for possible changes, but one thing that won't change is how e-cigarettes are treated under the law.

The move comes a day after dozens of people spoke out against the ban on flavoured tobacco and specifically against outlawing the "juice" used in e-cigarettes and vaporizers.

Former smokers say Bill 60 is a bad idea. It was before the Law Amendments Committee at Province House on Monday so the public could have a say on the proposed changes.

Many who spoke before the committee were unhappy with the bill, especially when it comes to electronic cigarettes or vaporizers.

People who used to smoke regular tobacco and have switched to what's called "vaping" say it has helped them.

Premier Stephen McNeil said Tuesday that hearing from former smokers who have switched to vaping is one the reasons for rethinking the bill.

"In the meantime, we have to be careful that we're not actually affecting a product that is actually reducing the consumption of tobacco products by adults," he said.

"We heard very compelling stories that people felt that the e-juice, the e-cigarette was reducing their consumption of tobacco."

Health Minister Leo Glavine said no changes will be made to restrictions on vaping in public. He says e-cigarettes and vaporizers will still be treated like regular tobacco cigarettes under the law.

McNeil says he'd still like to see Bill 60 passed during the fall sitting which may wrap up this week.

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