Carol MacLean and her husband own a mini-home in Troy Trailer Court

Carol MacLean and her husband own a mini-home in Troy Trailer Court. She said they'll have to find a new trailer park or buy some land. (CBC)

More than 60 people living in a Cape Breton trailer park say they're in shock after their landlord told them they need to find a new place to live by mid-June.

The tenants, who live in a trailer park known as Troy Trailer Court, say their landlord Troy Nova Scotia Ltd. issued letters indicating sewer and water services will be cut off as of June 11.

"The Troy cost to operate the sewer and water system today and in the foreseeable future has become prohibitive," says a letter signed by company president John Webb.

"In addition, there is not enough rental income collected to cover the expenses needed to continue the daily operations at Troy."

Carol MacLean and her husband own a mini-home in the park. She said they'll have to find a new trailer park or buy some land. Either option will be expensive, she said — between $6,000 and $9,000 to move and set up the mini-home in a new location.

"You have to have an electrician come in and take your mast off, then you have to get it put up, you've got to get permits from Nova Scotia Power. Got to have a place to put it," she said.

"We're all angry, frustrated, don't know where we're going to go. There's no place to go."

MacLean said there are a lot of elderly people in the trailer park who can't afford to move their homes. She said local politicians are trying to arrange a public meeting to consider the options.

CBC News was unable to reach Webb for a comment.

Troy Trailer Court corner store

Residents of Troy Trailer Court, a trailer park in Inverness County, said a corner store that employed four local residents was also closed abruptly. (CBC)

MacLean said he hadn't offered any further explanation to the residents of Troy Trailer Court.

"You can't get in touch with him. I called the management — that's Action Management in Antigonish — I called there yesterday and when I spoke to them there, they told me it was just not viable any longer," she said.

"That was the only response."

Residents say to make matters worse, four people who live in the trailer park are also out of a job because they worked at the local corner store owned by the same company. That corner store was closed over the weekend.

"I don't really want to move, but what do you do? I will have to sell my home and move, I guess," said Roy Gilbert.