The Black Educators Association (BEA) says it is reviewing the decision made by the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission which ruled it had discriminated against one of its employees, in part, because of the colour of her skin. The association is working with legal counsel to decide what step to take next.

"Where the BEA is a non-profit organization, any decision to incur legal costs and divert human resources must be weighed against the value of putting these resources to use ensuring the development of an equitable education system, so that African Nova Scotian learners are able to achieve their maximum potential, as the BEA has done for the past 45 years," it said in a statement.

The association was ordered to pay Rachel Brothers $11,000, plus interest, for general damages and lost income.

Rachel Brothers

Rachel Brothers filed a human rights complaint and claimed she was wrongfully fired from her position in 2006 as a regional educator with the Black Educators Association. (Facebook)

Brothers filed a human rights complaint in 2008, claiming she was wrongfully fired from her position in 2006 as a regional educator with the association because of "discrimination based on age, race and colour," according to a news release.

Donald Murray, chair of the Board of Inquiry formed by the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, said Brothers was "undermined by association staff whose 'colourist thinking' and behaviour created a toxic work environment at the head office in Halifax and the Annapolis Valley regional office in Kentville, where Ms. Brothers was employed as a regional educator."

The Black Educators Association is funded in part by the Nova Scotia Department of Education.