An increasing number of Nova Scotians are going to work, facing violence every day — and those who face the most violence in their workplace may surprise you.

According to the Workers' Compensation Board the following workplaces are the top five most violent for workers:

5) Education Administration

People working in the field of education administration sit fifth, in terms of time-loss claims after facing violence at 51 claims in the last seven years. Since 2007, 379 workers were injured due to violence.

This field includes teaching assistants, bus drivers and janitors — everyone that’s not a member of the teachers' union.

4) Correctional services

Workers in correctional services are fourth, in terms of time-loss claims after facing violence at 64 claims in the last seven years. Since 2007, 187 workers were injured due to violence.

3) Hospitals

Workers in hospitals sit third, in terms of time-loss claims after facing violence at 78 claims in the last seven years. Since 2007, 511 workers were injured due to violence.

2) Homes for people with mental disabilities 

Workers in homes for people with mental disabilities are second, in terms of time-loss claims after facing violence at 107 claims in the last seven years. Since 2007, 491 workers were injured due to violence.

1) Homes for personal and nursing care

People working in nursing homes or personal care homes missed the most work due to violence in the last seven years at 207 time-loss claims. Since 2007, 669 workers were injured after a violent encounter at work. 

Bites, cuts, bruises part of the job

Employees who are victims of violent workplace injuries were not anxious to speak on the record to media, worried about job security. 

However, one person working in a care facility told CBC News, in the space of two years they suffered three separate injuries, resulting in almost a year off work. That person said bites, cuts and bruises are a part of their day.

Kevin Kelloway, a Saint Mary's University psychology professor, has studied violence in the workplace. He has researched risk factors, including jobs where people work with the public, and provide care.  

He said correctional officers may expect to encounter violence, but others like caregivers  may not. 

“Even when you’re well trained and you recognize that people may not be aware of what they're doing, responsible of what they're doing — getting punched in the face still hurts,” he said. 

Joan Jessome, the president of the Nova Scotia Government and General Employees Union, represents all five areas where violence-related injuries are high. She said employers aren't doing enough to protect their workers.

“It comes to adequate staffing. It comes to putting things in place to make it that the safety of the staff is paramount and you have the safety of the staff to have the safety of the clients,” she said.

Susan Dempsey, executive director of Nova Scotia safety association Aware N.S., said her organization is working with the WCB and community services  to help those who work in potentially violent jobs.

“[We're] developing best practices and tools and resource guides to help staff to work more safely,” she said.