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2 H1N1 flu cases reported in Nova Scotia

There are now at least two confirmed reports of the flu strain H1N1 in Nova Scotia, according to the province’s deputy chief medical officer of health, and one is in the Capital District Health Authority.

Pharmacies swamped with people seeking vaccine

Community Health Nurse Amy Beck injects a patient with a H1N1 vaccine during a flu shot program in Calgary. Pregnant women who get the flu shot are less likely to have premature or low-birth-weight infants compared to those who don't get vaccinated, a study has found, confirming the results of earlier research. (Canadian Press)

There are now at least two confirmed reports of the flu strain H1N1 in Nova Scotia, according to the province’s deputy chief medical officer of health, and one is in the Capital District Health Authority.

Ten people have died and hundreds are in hospital with the virus in Alberta and now health officials fear the outbreak is moving east.

At pharmacies across Nova Scotia, it's been a busy week as people scramble to immunize.

Pharmacists like Tina Tayler say they are struggling to keep up.

“We actually just ran out this evening but we're expecting more tomorrow. There's no shortages that I'm aware of it's just it caught us a little off guard with the volume over the last week,” she said.

Deputy chief medical officer Dr. Frank Atherton said there is enough vaccine to go around, but he didn't expect so many people to roll up their sleeves at the pharmacy.  

“We initially expected about 20,000 doses to be delivered through the pharmacy outlet, we're up to about 50,000 so far. We have some stocks on reserve and we can provide those through the district health authorities if needed,” he said.

So far, about 500,000 doses of the vaccine have been sent out to health care providers around the province.

The flu season is expected to peak in February.

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