A woman whose husband pushed a shotgun at her head says he needs medical help, not a 10-year sentence.

Anne Warner, of Freeport, N.S., says the lengthy prison sentence isn't fair. But the sentence is within the range provided under the Criminal Code of Canada.

"I don't think he's in his right mind," she told CBC News on Monday.

Thomas Ogden, 64, was sentenced last Monday after pleading guilty to attempted murder.

On Jan. 2, Ogden snuck into the home he used to share with Warner, pushed her down and pointed a shotgun at her face.

Warner, also 64, said her husband had a blank look on his face and didn't say a word.

The two struggled, and Warner managed to push the gun aside before it went off right beside her head.

"But it didn't do any damage to me," she said.

A neighbour heard the commotion and smashed a cutting board over Ogden's head, knocking him out.

freeport, ns

Warner said her husband was never violent with her until he had a stroke. She said they were hoping he would have been sent for a neurological scan.

She said he should be sent for a medical evaluation.

Warner said Ogden gave up defending himself and just pleaded guilty.

Though she forgives him, she wouldn't welcome him back home right now.

Inmate assessments done

"I wouldn't feel safe the way he is. But I want him to get the help he needs," Warner said.

Etienne Chiasson, spokesman with the Correctional Service of Canada, said every new inmate is sent for an assessment. All assessments for the Atlantic region are done in the Springhill Institution. 

Ogden will be assessed psychologically and physically, Chiasson said. 

At the end of the assessment, corrections staff will decide Ogden's level of risk —to himself, to staff and to other inmates. 

Chiasson said the assessment will decide whether Ogden serves his sentence in a minimum, medium or maximum-security prison. 

The assessment, which lasts several weeks, will also determine the inmate's correctional plan, which could include training, counselling and treatment.