Who killed Billy Cholo? N.W.T. man hopes stickers bring attention to unsolved murder

Fort Simpson, N.W.T.'s Troy Bradbury is turning to guerilla marketing to keep a three-year-old unsolved murder in the public eye.

Troy Bradbury says community has reacted positively to stickers, and demand has been higher than expected

The simple stickers have stirred up a conversation in Fort Simpson, says Troy Bradbury. He's hoping the increased attention will lead to new leads in the three-year-old unsolved case. (Submitted by Troy Bradbury)

Fort Simpson, N.W.T.'s Troy Bradbury is turning to guerilla marketing to keep a three-year-old unsolved murder in the public eye.

Bradbury began giving away stickers last week. The stickers carry the simple message "Who killed Billy Cholo?" in reference to the death of a 45-year-old man fondly remembered in the community.

Cholo's body was found in a gazebo in the community in January of 2014, following an extensive search. Police arrested a suspect in relation to the murder in 2017, stating in a news release that they "believe there are witnesses with crucial information who have yet to come forward." That person was later released.

Billy Cholo was well known in the community. The 45-year-old was found dead in a gazebo in January 2014. (Facebook)

The case received significant attention around the community, leading to a public meeting and then N.W.T. senator Nick Sibbeston, who is from Fort Simpson, saying that the RCMP failed to follow a lead in Cholo's case, despite knowing about it for over a year. RCMP say they did follow up on the lead.

"I'm hoping that there's some sort of resolve from this," said Bradbury, adding that he hopes the stickers will encourage witnesses to come forward with any information. He's also hoping that the killer turns himself or herself in to RCMP.

'It’s definitely created a conversation, which it was totally intended for,' Bradbury said of the stickers. (Submitted by Troy Bradbury)
"Imagine being in a small community and there's a suspected murderer walking the streets that you see everyday," he said.

Bradbury says demand for the stickers has been higher than expected. He's getting another 250 printed off, and has been seeing them up in businesses around town.

He says he's been pleased with the positive reaction in the community.

"It's definitely created a conversation," he said. "Which it was totally intended for."

With files from Marc Winkler, Joanne Stassen, Jamie Malbeuf