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In an October 2006 interview with CBC-TV, a then-homeless Angel Carlick highlighted the need for a youth shelter. ((CBC))

Friends of 19-year-old Angel Carlick, whose body was found last week near Whitehorse, say they hope her death will create a legacy in the form of a homeless-youth shelter — something the slain teenager had called for when she was alive.

"She was an awesome girl, and we lost a great contributor to society," Vicki Durrant, executive director of the Blue Feather Youth Centre, said Wednesday.

"We want to continue what Angel fought for."

Whitehorse RCMP confirmed on Tuesday that they had found the body of Carlick, who had been missing since May, in a wooded area in the Pilot Mountain subdivision on Friday. Police are currently awaiting the results of an autopsy as they investigateher death.

Carlick had worked at the downtown Whitehorse youth centre before her disappearance. At the time, friends said Carlick was putting her life together: she was graduating from high school, holding down a job and rooming with a friend while she dreamed of finding her own place to live.

It was a change from October 2006, when a then homeless Carlick had talked to CBC News about life on the streets. At the time, she had spoken publicly several times about the need for a homeless-youth shelter.

"After work you have to find, like, somewhere to stay, or you have to find somewhere to … take a shower or something," Carlick said in an interview.

Shortly after learning Carlick's body had been found, friends renewed their calls for the Yukon government to create a youth shelter. Family friend Irma Scarff told CBC News that Carlick's death might have been prevented if she and other homeless youth had a safe place to stay.

Whitehorse used to have a homeless-youth shelter, but the Road to Home shelter closed its doors in 2004 due to a lack of funding.

Durrant said she hopes to release details soon on a new shelter currently in the works. If such a shelter becomes a reality, she said, she believes it will serve as a legacy to Carlick's life.