Can you sum up Yukon in a nutshell? The Whitehorse Legion is launching a contest for a Yukon motto.

The organization wants to have the motto in place before the start of Canada's 150th anniversary celebrations next year when it will be officially unveiled.

The contest is open to all current and former Yukoners and people can enter online at the Whitehorse Royal Canadian Legion website. 

"We're working on the pride of the people," said Legion Vice-president Red Grossinger.

Submissions will be judged on the following criteria:

  • identifiable with the Yukon and easily understood;
  • descriptive and reflective of the Yukon;
  • originality and meaningfulness of the content; and
  • inspirational and motivational aspects of the content.
Yukon Flag

Yukon's flag design was the result of a similar contest organized by the Legion back in 1967.

Organizers say it's important that people entering the contest know the difference between a motto and a slogan. By their definition, a slogan is a phrase used in commercial, political, religious and advertising as a repetitive expression of an idea like. "Larger Than Life" or "The Magic and the Mystery."

A motto is a short saying expressing the guiding maxim of an organization, a guiding principal or an ideal.

Entries will be judged by a group of prominent Yukoners. "Their identities are being kept secret," said Grossinger. All entries will be assigned a number so judges won't know the name of the entrant.

The contest closes midnight Feb. 29. The winning entry will have to be approved by the Yukon government and then sent to Ottawa to continue the regulatory process to make it official.  That's expected to take six to eight months.

Yukon and N.W.T. are the only jurisdictions in Canada that do not have a motto. 

Working from experience 

It's not the first time the Whitehorse Legion has held a contest for an important territorial symbol.

In 1967, as Canadians were marking the country's centennial, the Legion held a contest for an official Yukon flag.

There were 137 submissions with the winning design submitted by Yukon College graduate Lynn Lambert.

The flag was officially adopted March 1, 1968