Ross River bridge's wooden deck to be removed

Government officials say the deck of the suspension bridge at Ross River, Yukon, will be removed to help assess the integrity of the steel towers.
Government officials say the deck of the suspension bridge at Ross River, Yukon, will be removed to help assess the integrity of the steel towers.

Government officials say the deck of the suspension bridge at Ross River, Yukon, will be dismantled to help assess the integrity of the steel towers.

An engineering report last fall found the 70-year-old bridge in imminent danger of collapse. The government removed the steps leading to the bridge and secured the area.

Now, the wooden deck will be taken down while the ice is on the river.

"The engineering advice we're getting is telling us because we don't have the original drawings of the bridge structure itself, and the structural factors that went into it, even changing the load factors can create some dangerous situations so we are going to have to have an expert opinion," said Harvey Brooks, deputy minister of Community Services.

The 300-metre bridge was built in the mid-1940s to carry a pipeline across the Pelly River. Since then, it has been used as a foot bridge by residents.

Government officials say the final fate of the bridge hasn't been determined. They say they'll know more about the condition of the towers once the load has been removed.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.