Ross River bridge granted a temporary reprieve

The Yukon government is putting the demolition of the suspension bridge at Ross River on hold to get a second opinion on the health of the historic structure.

The Yukon government is putting the demolition of the suspension bridge at Ross River on hold to get a second opinion on the health of the historic structure.

Community Services Minister Brad Cathers made that commitment in the territorial legislature this week, in response to a petition calling for the bridge to be saved.

Yukon Community Services Minister Brad Cathers says the government is putting the demolition of the suspension bridge at Ross River on hold to get a second opinion on the health of the historic structure.

"We arranged for a peer review to be done by a respected authority on bridges," he said.

"Once that report has been received and given consideration by department staff, we will be sharing that with the community of Ross River including the Ross River First Nation prior to making a decision."

In September, the government hired engineers to inspect the 70-year-old bridge. They reported the bridge was unsafe and could collapse at any time.

The government made plans to tear the bridge down this winter but residents signed a petition urging the government to save it.

The wooden suspension footbridge was built in 1942 by the American army to carry a pipeline across the Pelly River as part of the Second World War Canol Road project. 

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