The City of Iqaluit is moving along with plans to build a new subdivision along the Road to Nowhere to accommodate the city’s rapidly growing population.

City planners are holding a public meeting at the Anglican Parish Hall tonight at 6:30.

“We're hoping to hear from people about the phasing,” says Gayle Kabloona. “Also the different types of uses: commercial, residential, low density, high density, and what people think about that.”

Good Lovelies Road to Nowhere

Members of the Canadian band The Good Lovelies pose next to Iqaluit's Road to Nowhere sign. (The Good Lovelies)

The first Road to Nowhere development included mainly single family homes and some larger apartment buildings.

Construction is scheduled to start in 2016 on a new, mixed development that includes low, medium and high density housing, institutional and commercial space, two parks and walking and snowmobile trails. (See map below.)

“A lot of people are interested, whether it's in the housing or the development or the recreational uses,” Kabloona says.

Planners are also looking for input on an Inuktitut name for the new subdivision.

Until now, Iqaluit’s Road to Nowhere has actually led to great hiking, skiing, berry-picking and even swimming opportunities.

Lots at a premium

Building space is at a premium in the growing city of about 7,000 people.

Habitat for Humanity Iqaluit has constructed houses in the city since 2007.

Glenn Cousins, chair of the board, says this summer, the group will concentrate on raising funds for its next project, partly because of the lack of open lots.

"The new subdivision that the city is putting in is probably not going to be ready until 2017, so we may have to wait until then, unless another opportunity comes up for a lot within the city where there is an empty space for some reason.”

Iqaluit Road to Nowhere Subdivision 2014

Plans for the City of Iqaluit's newest subdivision will be discussed at a community meeting in the capital tonight. (City of Iqaluit)