Proposed railway through Yukon and Alaska ready for feasibility study

A proposed northern railway that would carry petroleum products from Alberta to an Alaskan port is projected to cost at least $28 billion, according to a recently released pre-feasibility study.

Cost is estimated at $28 billion, according to initial study

A proposed northern railway that would carry petroleum products from Fort McMurray, Alta., to an Alaskan port is projected to cost at least $28 billion, according to a recently released pre-feasibility study. 

The line would run past Watson Lake, Ross River and Carmacks before continuing through central Yukon to Alaska.

A proposed northern railway that would carry petroleum products from Alberta to an Alaskan port is projected to cost at least $28 billion, according to a recently released pre-feasibility study. (Matthew Brown/Associated Press)

Similar ideas have been floated for years. The current proposal builds on a similar one studied by the Alaska and Yukon governments a decade ago.

This time, Alberta Energy got involved and decided to do another study, with the help of the Van Horne Institute.

Proponent Matt Vickers, who brought the idea to Alberta Energy, says the next step is to finish raising $20 million to complete a full feasibility study, which will include consulting with First Nations along the route.

"[We want to] get this information back to all the communities along the route to ensure the routing we are suggesting is the best routing and is avoiding any sensitive areas with respect to all the communities," he said. 

Vickers hopes to convince the federal government to kick in about $10 million for the study. 

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