A Yukoner has been granted a federal licence to broadcast user-generated video, including pornography.

The CRTC, the federal regulator of radio and television, has approved two separate applications to supply "video-on-demand."

Tagish, Yukon, resident Rob Hopkins created software that cobbles together the videos, which can come from anywhere in Canada. Now he can sell that program to cable companies across the country.

The plan has already generated opposition from critics who say the licence opens the door to possible exploitation, depending on how the content is regulated.

Hopkins says that's not his responsibility.

"I don't plan on moderating it, I give out a leased car, for example, that's my model right. You're a cable company, I give you the system and what not. You can moderate it,” Hopkins says.

Hopkins is well known in Yukon. He runs a community radio program in Tagish.

He plans to use a program called "Open Broadcaster" to televise videos submitted by anyone who owns a camera in Canada. Those videos can be of anything, including porn.

Women's groups are concerned the license could lead to sexual exploitation.

Larisse McDonald with the Victoria Faulkner Women's Centre in Whitehorse says there should be safeguards.

"I would be concerned with oversight and enforcement of guidelines, in terms of making sure that there is no sexualized exploitation and harassment,” McDonald says.

Hopkins says there are laws that protect against exploitation.

"On the adult-generated channel, that will only be among consenting adults and adults of legal age," he said. "You can't do anything illegal. There's some things you cannot do in the Criminal Code that you're not allowed to do as far as pornography in Canada and that wouldn't be allowed as far as the terms of service."

Hopkins says the channel will be moderated. He says he won't be doing that himself but someone will.

When Hopkins applied for the licence, he agreed to develop guidelines and policy with the Yukon Film and Sound Commission. 

Barbara Dunlop, director of the Yukon Film and Sound Commission, says she's never heard from Hopkins and did not know about the CRTC decision.

"The Film and Sound Commission doesn't support adult programming and we don't have a regulatory role in it," she said. "If Mr. Hopkins cares to come into the office, then we can provide him general information on matters in the film industry as we would with anyone else."

So far no cable company has yet signed up for Hopkins' programs.

He has two years to find a client until he loses the licences.