A six-time Olympic medallist is throwing her support behind a Northwest Territories’ First Nation’s efforts to create a park.

Clara Hughes, who is the only athlete to have won medals in both the Summer and Winter Olympics, is in Lutsel K’e this week.

The community of 300 on the East Arm of Great Slave Lake is in the midst of negotiating a national park with Ottawa. Thaidene Nene would cover just over 30,000 square kilometres of land and lakes.

Hughes is spreading the word about the initiative.

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Clara Hughes, the only athlete to have won medals in both the Summer and Winter Olympics, is in Lutsel K’e this week to push for the creation of the Thaidene Nene national park. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

Steven Nitah, of the Lustel K'e Dene First Nation, welcomes the support.

"She (Hughes) got to know the people of Lustel K'e and got into a very positive relationship with both the community and Thaidene Nene and she believes in the vision that the community created for Thaidene Nene. So she's agreed to put a spotlight on that using her star power and the community is thrilled for it."

In addition to her Olympic accomplishments, Hughes is a member of the Order of Canada, Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and a supporter of Right To Play, which encourages sport participation in developing countries.

Hughes will head to Yellowknife on Thursday.

Her plans include skating with the Yellowknife Speed-Skating Club on Frame Lake.

Hughes will also spend two days making presentations with members of the Lustel K'e Dene First Nation about Thaidene Nene.