N.W.T.'s top doctor expects flu cases to peak in March

Dr. Andre Corriveau, chief medical health officer for the Northwest Territories, says the N.W.T. flu season is getting off to a late start.

Flu vaccine proving effective this year, says Dr. Andre Corriveau

Dr. Andre Corriveau, chief medical health officer for the Northwest Territories, says the N.W.T. flu season is getting off to a late start. (CBC)

N.W.T.'s chief medical health officer says this year's flu vaccine is so far proving more effective than last year's.

Last year's vaccine protected people against some strains of influenza, but offered most people virtually no protection against the strain that caused most of the illnesses, H3N2.

Dr. Andre Corriveau, chief medical health officer for the Northwest Territories, says the N.W.T. flu season is getting off to a late start.

"So far the majority of cases are H1N1, so the vaccine is very good this year for that strain, so it looks like unless there is a new strain that comes in behind it we would have lower overall activity, but it's too early to tell."

Twenty-nine cases of flu have been lab-confirmed in the territory this year. Corriveau said no one with an officially confirmed case of flu had been vaccinated.

He said he expects the number of cases to peak at the beginning of March and for a second wave to hit at the end of that month.

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