Nunavut FASD posters provoke strong reaction

The Nunavut government’s dramatic new campaign to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is provoking a strong reaction from residents.

The Nunavut government’s dramatic new campaign to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is provoking a strong reaction from residents.

“Looking at this picture, you really feel bad for the unborn babies,” says Gary Arnaquq. “It’s very worrisome.”

Suzie Muckpah says the unborn child should come first when it comes to healthy pregnancy.

“Anything we consume goes to their blood so I support this,” she says. “We always have to choose wisely: alcohol or the child. We need to think of our child and choose which one we want.”

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder or FASD can cause a range of physical, mental and behavioural problems in children whose mothers drink during pregnancy.

Nunavut is believed to have a high rate of children born with FASD, but the difficulty of diagnosing the disease means statistics are unavailable.

The posters were designed by Yulia Mychkina for Atiigo Media Inc. in Iqaluit. 

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