NTPC now generating power for Norman Wells, taking over from Imperial Oil

The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is now generating electricity for the Town of Norman Wells, taking over from Imperial Oil.

Imperial Oil announced it was suspending its oil production in Norman Wells earlier this year

The Northwest Territories Power Corporation is now generating electricity for the Town of Norman Wells, taking over from Imperial Oil. (CBC)

The Northwest Territories Power Corporation (NTPC) is now generating electricity for the town of Norman Wells, taking over from Imperial Oil. 

For the past 28 years, power generated by Imperial Oil was sold to the NTPC, which the power corporation then used to supply the town with electricity.

But Imperial Oil announced it was suspending production at its field in Norman Wells earlier this year, raising questions about how the community of about 800 would be powered. 

NTPC spokeswoman Pam Coulter couldn't say how much more it will cost the corporation to generate its own power. (Jacob Barker/CBC)
On Friday, NTPC announced it would use its backup diesel plant to supply power for the duration of Imperial Oil's shutdown. 

NTPC spokesperson Pam Coulter says rates aren't expected to go up in the short-term, but could go up if the shutdown drags on.

"At this point we don't expect any change," she told CBC. "If it's a long-term shutdown it may be different. 

"If it's short term, there won't be any difference at all, we don't expect rates to go up." 

Imperial Oil hasn't given any indication how long its shutdown might last. 

Coulter couldn't immediately say how much more it will cost the corporation to generate its own power.

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