N.W.T. communities' meeting moved to K'atl'odeehche reserve

The Northwest Territories Association of Communities has decided to move its annual general meeting from Hay River to the nearby K'atl'odeeche First Nation reserve due to the ongoing strike by town workers.

Conference of municipal governments moved due to Hay River municipal strike

Hay River , N.W.T., municipal workers picket in front of the Hay River recreation centre on Feb. 9. The union representing the workers has said it would picket the N.W.T. Association of Communities' upcoming annual general meeting even if it were moved to the nearby K'atl'odeeche reserve. (Jacob Barker/CBC)

The Northwest Territories Association of Communities has decided to move its annual general meeting to the K'atl'odeeche First Nation reserve due to the ongoing strike by municipal workers in Hay River.

The association represents the municipal governments of the N.W.T.'s 33 communities.

The annual general meeting, and a conference on governing, had been scheduled to be held at Hay River's arena. The arena has been closed due to the strike.

The K'atl'odeeche reserve is located on the east side of Hay River at the mouth of Great Slave Lake. The town of Hay River is located on the west side of the river.

In a news release, the Association of Communities said it decided to move the meeting to the reserve so that delegates would not need to change travel or hotel arrangements, and so Hay River businesses would retain the economic benefits of hosting the event.

The Union of Northern Workers, which represents Hay River's municipal employees, has said it would picket the event even if it were held on the reserve. The union and the town are slated to return to the bargaining table on Sunday.

The meeting is scheduled for May 7-10.

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