Iqaluit looks to remove posts, boulders from curbs

Iqaluit is one step closer to clearing the edge of city streets of nuisance boulders and posts that were originally installed for safety.

'I think it was a terrible idea to put them in in the first place,' says councillor Kenny Bell

Iqaluit city council took steps yesterday to begin removing the controversial posts and boulders that line the sides of many streets. Originally installed for safety, they've now been deemed a nuisance. (The Canadian Press)

Iqaluit is one step closer to clearing the edge of city streets of nuisance boulders and posts that were originally installed for safety.

City Council has passed a set of criteria to decide when to remove the items.

Kenny Bell chairs the Planning and Development Committee. He originally put forward the motion to remove the posts.

“I don't think that the posts should ever have been put in, but they were and now that they're there. They do delineate between the road and the sidewalk,” he said. “So we do have to look at ways to fix that of course, but I think it was a terrible idea to put them in in the first place.”

The boulders and posts were installed in the early 2000s to prevent traffic-related deaths, because of a recommendation stemming from a coroner's inquest.

Now, council has decided that if they impede traffic, road maintenance or snow clearing, the boulders and posts can be removed.

That's if they aren't needed to show where the road ends and the sidewalk begins.      

Bell said it should cost less to remove the boulders and posts than it did to install them. He estimates that cost has now totalled approximately $1 million.

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