mi-piqqusilirivvik

Classes have begun at the Piqqusilirivvik Inuit cultural school in Clyde River, Nunavut, with 25 students enrolled for the fall term. (CBC)

Classes have finally begun at the new Inuit cultural school in Clyde River, Nunavut, with 25 students enrolled for the fall term.

The $32 million Piqqusilirivvik facility is meant to teach Inuit traditional knowledge to Nunavut land claim beneficiaries. All the programming is delivered in Inuktitut by elders who act as instructors, advisers and counsellors.

"When we addressed them in the opening ceremonies, we talked to them about the Inuit way of learning which is helping out others," said Jonathan Palluq, director of Piqqusilirivvik. "If somebody's doing something or trying to haul a boat, working on qamutiit or Ski-Doo, (by) getting involved and helping out, that's the way Inuit learn."

The centre officially opened last May. Courses were supposed to start in September, but there were too few applicants at that time.

The programs are offered free of charge to any Nunavut land claim beneficiary.

Much of the course-work is aimed at helping students survive on the land.

The fall term ends next month. The centre hasn't announced when applications will be accepted for the next term.