Cape Dorset school expected to cost $34M

Construction could start next summer on a new high school in Cape Dorset that the Nunavut government estimates will cost $34 million. It follows what is believed to be a case of arson that destroyed the community's high school earlier this month.

Construction could begin next summer

The remains of Peter Pitseolak High School in Cape Dorset, Nunavut, after a fire was deliberately set in September. The government estimates a new school will cost $34 million. (Jordan Konek/CBC)

Construction could start next summer on a new high school in Cape Dorset that the Nunavut government estimates will cost $34 million.

The hamlet's Peter Pitseolak high school burned down in September in what is believed to be a case of arson. Three teenagers are facing charges. 

In the legislature Tuesday, David Joanasie, Cape Dorset's MLA, pressed cabinet for more details. 

He heard that the new building will likely be smaller than the Peter Pitseolak school, because enrolment has gone down.

The new school may just offer Grades 8 through 12, instead of starting in Grade 7.

As for the location, the school could be built where the new health centre was going to go.

By the end of yesterday's session, MLAs approved $1 million for the design of the new school. The project will be a design-build, meaning whoever wins the contract to design the school will also construct it.

"That's never been done yet here in Nunavut and I understand in other jurisdictions they've used that approach, which has speeded up the process of building facilities," Joanasie said. 

Joanasie also said he's looking forward to the day students will graduate from the new high school.

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